Search results

3 results found.

June 29-July 3, 2020 

 

 

a look back at this week’s essays…

 

Investment Real Estate Outlook for the Rest of 2020 and Beyond 

 

I am concerned – very concerned – for two reasons…

 

Click here to read more.

 

 

Found Poem: In the Basement of OK Cigars 

 

I’ve been writing poems for years. Hundreds and hundreds of them. A small percentage get into print. And most of those, when I reread them after a year or two, are disappointing.

 

This one was not. I like it as much now as when I wrote it…

 

Click here to read more.

 

 

I’m Positive 

 

I’ve written at least a half-dozen essays on the coronavirus and COVID-19 since the beginning of April…

 

On Wednesday, I found out that I was positive.

 

Click here to read more.

 

 

 

quick quiz 

 

  1. How much do you remember about this week’s “Words to the Wise”? Use each of these words in a sentence: 

 

*  hospitality (6/29/20)

*  fugacious (7/1/20)

*  portentous (7/3/20)

 

  1. Fill in the blanks in this week’s quotations: 

 

* “The most reliable way to forecast the future is to try to understand _____.” – John Naisbitt (6/29/20)

 

* “_____ is when an emotion has found its thought and the thought has found words.” – Robert Frost (7/1/20)

 

* “Accept the terrible _____ of life with eyes wide open.” – Jordan Peterson

(7/3/20)

 

  1. Are these statements True or False? 

 

* Pierre Boulle, author of The Bridge Over the River Kwai, was held in captivity by the Japanese during WWII. (6/29/20)

 

*  According to the Becker Friedman Institute for Economics, one-third of jobs in the US can be done at home. (7/1/20)

 

*  The US isn’t the only country to celebrate the 4th of July. America’s Independence Day is also celebrated in Britain, Portugal, Sweden, Denmark, Norway, Ireland, China, and Australia. (7/3/20)

 

 

 

recommended links from this week’s blog 

 

* An amazing display of beauty, strength, flexibility, and grace…Here

 

* The latest issue of Independent HealingWhat medical care is safe during the pandemic? Click here to read the July issue.

 

* Good advice from the FTC on shopping online…Here

 

 * If you like language you will love this guy… Here

 

 

 

Q&A 

 

Your Question:

 

I’ve been reading a lot about entrepreneurship lately, including lots of your essays and a few of your books. I’d love to have a business of my own, but I have family to support and I’m working full-time just to make ends meet. I have zero savings, and student loans to pay. I’m not in a position to make any risky moves. People that I love and feel responsible for depend on me. What can I do?

– J.P.

 

My Answer: 

 

I hear you. I was in very much the same situation in 1982 when I took a new job as managing editor of a start-up publishing company in Florida. I had, like you, zero savings, and a family to support.

 

There are several things I could suggest – things that involve working 20 to 40 hours a week on the side, earning extra income and learning about entrepreneurship. But that’s not what I did back then. So I’ll tell you what I did. I put off my plans to be an entrepreneur and worked like mad to become the next best thing – an intrapreneur employee working for a growing company.

 

I define an intrapreneur as an employee that makes himself financially invaluable to the company – so much so that he earns his way into a profit-sharing compensation plan.

 

Back then, as I said, I was working as an editor. I was making $35,000 a year, which was enough to pay the bills and as much as I was worth to the company. I couldn’t ask for more money for doing the work I was doing because my boss could have said “No thanks” and hired another managing editor at the same salary.

 

Instead, I decided to become the most important employee my boss had, which meant that I spent evenings and weekends learning the marketing game and writing advertising copy. When my first promotion was mailed and brought in a million dollars, my boss took me aside and said, “Keep that up and I’ll cut you into the business.”

 

Years later, after failing to retire for the first time, I took a consulting position with the business I work with now. The job I asked for was to help grow sales and profits. I accepted a modest monthly fee for working 60 to 80 hours a week. But I also got a modest percentage of profits.

 

That was pretty fair money as sales edged up from $8 million to $24 million to $50 million and then to $100 million. Today, profits are more than 10 times greater than they were back then.

 

That’s what I did. It worked out for me. If it feels like a direction you’d like to go in, the key is to work for a fair-minded boss in a fast-growing company.

 

Have a question for me? Submit it on our Contact Us page. 

 

 

 

For a look back at the stock market, click here. 

Continue Reading

An amazing display of beauty, strength, flexibility, and grace.

 

Continue Reading