viridity (noun) 

Viridity (vuh-RID-ih-tee) refers to youth, innocence, inexperience. Example from Theodore Edward Hook: “What intellectual viridity that exemplary creature possesses!”

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insidious (adjective) 

Insidious (in-SID-ee-us) means stealthily treacherous or deceitful. As I used it today: “In a recent essay, Bill Bonner provided an excellent quick history lesson in the insidious and unintended effects [of bad economic policy].”

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pragmatism (noun) 

Pragmatism (PRAG-muh-tizm) is a practical approach to thinking of or dealing with problems, rather than using theory or abstract principles. As I used it today: “I like to think of myself as an individualist and a contrarian, but most of all as a pragmatist.”

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supersede vs. supercede (verb)

To supersede (soo-per-SEED) is to take the place of a person or thing previously in authority or use. Supercede is a misspelling… and has been a common mistake for centuries. As I used it today: “[Direct marketers] already have much more useful information – historical response data – that often supersedes or contradicts demographic assumptions.”

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coup de foudre (noun) 

Coup de foudre (koo duh FOO-druh), a French expression, literally means thunderbolt. It is often used to describe a sudden unforeseen event – in particular, love at first sight. As used by Susan Choi in My Education: “Coup de foudre; perhaps it was real. One went from believing, when twenty, that it was the kind of love that was real, to believing, once closer to forty, that it was not only fragile but false – the inferior, infantile, doomed love of twenty-year-olds.”

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axiomatic (adjective) 

Axiomatic (ak-see-uh-MAT-ik) means self-evident, obvious. As used by Charles Theodore Murray in Mlle. Fouchette: “Like most generalizations, the statement that a woman cannot climb a tree is not an axiomatic truth.”

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ancillary (adjective) 

Something that’s ancillary (AN-suh-lare-ee) provides necessary support to the primary activities or operation of an organization institution, industry, or system. As I used it today: “Understanding the limitations of compound interest can be a good thing if it spurs you to face reality and develop ancillary plans.”

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tranche (noun) 

A tranche (TRANTSH) is a portion of something, especially money. As I used it today: “Since I want [the investments I’m making in my family, friends, and various charities] to continue after K and I die, I’m finding them now with tranches of existing income-producing assets.”

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circumvent (vert) 

To circumvent (sur-kum-VENT) is to manage to get around an obstacle or difficulty; to avoid defeat, failure, unpleasantness, etc. by ingenuity or deception. As I used it today: “Recently, though, one of my CEOs did a very smart thing. Tired of circumventing my emails, she began sending me her suggestions.”

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demonization (noun) 

Demonization (dee-muh-nuh-ZAY-shun) is the portrayal of something as wicked and threatening. As used by Alec Baldwin in today’s quote, above: “The demonization of wealth in this country is mind-blowing.”

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