quarantine (verb, noun)

To quarantine (KWOR-un-teen) is to place people or animals in isolation to prevent the spread of disease or pests. The term comes from medieval efforts to fight the black death. Read about it here.

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moratorium (noun) 

A moratorium (mor-uh-TOR-ee-um) is a temporary suspension of an activity or obligation. As I used it today: “We also have to prepare for the possibility of a rent moratorium. That would be zero income coming in. And that would mean no cash to pay the people that maintain those properties and no cash to pay the utilities, and so on.”

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epidemiology (noun) 

Epidemiology (ep-ih-dee-mee-AHL-uh-jee) is the branch of medicine that deals with the incidence, distribution, and possible control of diseases and other factors relating to health.

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anomaly (noun) 

An anomaly (un-NOM-uh-lee) is a deviation from the common rule, type, arrangement, or form. As I used it today: “[If, as Tom Dyson hypothesizes,] ‘it’s the supply and demand in the notional gold market that sets the gold price… not supply and demand in the physical gold market…’ this could explain the anomaly.”

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Black Swan event (noun) 

Black Swan is an unpredictable event that is beyond what is normally expected of a situation and has potentially severe consequences. Black Swan events are characterized by their extreme rarity, their severe impact, and the widespread insistence they were obvious in hindsight. (Source: Investopedia)

As I used it today: “The point is that Black Swan events do happen. And when they create recessions, thousands of businesses go belly-up and millions of workers lose their jobs.”

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promulgate (verb) 

To promulgate (PRAH-mul-gate) is to formally proclaim or put into action. As used by Karen Armstrong: “The first person to promulgate the Golden Rule… was Confucius 500 years before Christ.”

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lugubrious (adjective) 

Lugubrious (loo-GOO-bree-us) means sad, dismal, gloomy. As used by Victor Hugo in The Man Who Laughs: “After the disappearance of day into the vast of silent obscurity, he became in lugubrious accord with all around him.”

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instigate (verb) 

To instigate (IN-stih-gate) is to bring about or initiate an action or event. As I used it today: “Like every crash I’ve mentioned, [the “Great Recession” crash of 2008/2009] followed a long-term bull market (from 2002 to 2007). Also like the others, it was instigated by speculation. Not so much by speculation in conventional stocks, but by the widespread use of mortgage-backed securities in the housing sector.”

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equanimity (noun) 

Equanimity (ee-kwuh-NIM-ih-tee) is calmness; mental or emotional stability or composure, especially under tension or strain. As I used it today: “For insight into why I was getting so upset and a clue about how I could deal with these inevitable letdowns with more equanimity, I looked into two schools of philosophy.”

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