desiccated (adjective) 

To desiccate (DES-ih-kate) is to remove the moisture from; to become completely and thoroughly dry. As I used it today: “[When the bodies of the pharaohs] were found years later – desiccated, linen-wrapped bones – their treasures were gone. Plundered.”

 

Continue Reading

opuscule (noun)

An opuscule (oh-PUSK-yool) is a work of art or music that is considered to be minor or insignificant. Some critics might, for example, describe Shakespeare’s King John or Pericles as an opuscule.

Continue Reading

misogyny (noun) 

Misogyny (mih-SAH-uh-nee) is a dislike of, contempt for, or ingrained prejudice against women. As I used it today: “Saudi Arabia, traditionally one of the world’s most misogynistic countries, has granted women the right to travel overseas without male permission.”

Continue Reading

parsimonious (adjective) 

Parsimonious (par-sih-MOH-nee-us) means stingy or frugal; restrained. As I used it today: “So that was something else to think about – the fact that we are each parsimonious with the one thing we want for ourselves.”

Continue Reading

venerate (verb) 

To venerate (VEN-uh-rate) is to revere; to regard with great respect. As I used it today: “With respect to your career, what’s more important: being admired for your character… or venerated for your success?

Continue Reading

proscribe (verb) 

To proscribe (proh-SKRIBE) is to formally forbid, denounce, or condemn. (Not to be confused with prescribe, which means recommend.) As I used it today: “Dictonary.com has published many insanely dumb essays proscribing language before, but this has to be one of the dumbest.”

Continue Reading

pragmatic (adjective) 

Pragmatic (Prag-MAT-ik) describes a way of dealing with things realistically, in a way that is based on practical rather than theoretical considerations. As I used it today: “There’s a pragmatic benefit to being admired.”

 

Continue Reading

slavish (adjective) 

Slavish (SLAY-vish) means like a slave; abjectly submissive. As I used it today: “If I thought that everyone that listened to me would always do exactly what I recommend, slavishly, I’d give no advice at all!”

Continue Reading

abstruse (adjective) 

Something that’s abstruse (ab-STROOS) is hard to understand; obscure. As I used it today: “Once we located a fast-growing market, we studied it. But again, we didn’t rely on abstruse market analysis to figure out what sort of products to offer.”

Continue Reading

churlish (adjective) 

Churlish (CHURL-ish) means rude, vulgar, surly. As used by Christopher Morley: “Happiness is surely the best teacher of good manners: only the unhappy are churlish in deportment.”

Continue Reading